Reflections: Cuba

37 countries later, I finally set foot on Cuban soil.

Cuba is a fascinating place where the Spanish guitar probably first fell in love with the African drum, creating the most interesting genres of music which we all dance to today.

It is also a place where the story of colonialism, neo-colonialism, revolution and progress unfolds in such dramatic fashion, and is still a work in progress.

Overall, a country with friendly Cubanos, passionate music, frozen-in-time street-scenes and in my opinion, an impending paradigm shift in how the country will progress towards the latter half of the 21st century.

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Logistics: If you are travelling from the US, the most convenient points of transit are Mexico or Canada (direct charter flights from the US are increasingly available, but still tremendously expensive). Bring Euros or Canadian dollars to exchange at a local cadega (money exchange). Speaking Spanish will be very helpful, although most tourist-related infrastructure in Havana will be able to communicate in some form of English.

You could probably read guidebooks online or your Lonely Planet to get an idea of what to see/do in Cuba, so I will instead share with you 4 random things you probably should know, from my experience…

  1. Taxi particulares – these are the local taxis (basically any 1950s-looking car with a taxi sign up top) that you should definitely be taking because they cost about 10 times less than a “yellow taxi” which I presume caters to foreigners. The local taxis do, however, go on certain routes and so prior to hopping on, you will need to ask if the driver is going in your general direction. Each person needs to pay 10 local pesos (~0.50 euros at time of writing). If you get a chance to, peer under the hood of one of these old 1950s Chevrolets, you will be surprised to find a retrofitted Nissan or Toyota engine in there!

    My 1950s ride

  2. Local food stalls – the prices in Cuba, especially where tourist volumes are high, can vary significantly. I have paid as much as 15 convertible pesos, and as little as 1 convertible peso for the exact same meal. Speaking Spanish will help, because you can walk around and ask for directions to local eateries. Trust me, you will know right away when you are in a local eatery – there will hardly be any foreigners around. Make an attempt to stray a little off the beaten track/tourist hot spots in Old Havana, and you will be sure to find plenty  of local options around every corner.

    Distribution centres for subsidized food supplies

  3. Drink the coffee (from the local street stalls) – Cubans brew their coffee along with molasses, which produces a bitter-sweet concoction fit for kings. They cost about 1 local peso per tiny shot, so a full cup of coffee may set you back a whole 5 local pesos. You can also have the same drink in a restaurant at about 10 times the price at a local stall. Go figure.

    Cubans are pretty damn good at chillin’

     

  4. Go to Trinidad – period. One of the first things you will notice about Trinidad is the sound of horse hooves against the cobblestone streets and peddlers hawking bread and pastries from their bicycles. I have been to a few colonial towns (San Miguel de Allende in Mexico, Pelourinho in Bahia Brazil etc) and none have come across more real and pure as Trinidad. Although tourist infrastructure such as restaurants, bars and hotels have sprung up, most of Trinidad still remains in its tranquil form, with Cubanos living their lives as it seems to be half a century ago. Again, veer off the Main Square into the side streets and you will find the true Trinidad sitting there unblemished. Also, hike up the track past the bar-in-a-cave to the top of the cerro where the communication tower stands, chat up the security guard and he may just let you into the compound where you can get a 360-degree birds’ eye view of the entire valley. 

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Cuba moving forward… will be an interesting story to witness!

From what I have noticed, the socialist state does a pretty decent job in providing free education, healthcare and subsidized sundries for every Cubano. Roads are good, most people have a roof over their heads, and general happiness is still derived from family ties and social activities (dancing, music, sports etc.). However, the growing income disparity is becoming a sizable issue at the back of everyone’s mind. Although tourist-serving establishments/ jobs pay a higher tax to the state, the prices being charged are ~10times higher than the local equivalent, and this provides a select group of the population with higher purchasing power to enjoy modern luxury goods (think smartphones, new cars etc.). Imagine the monthly salary of a state-worker of 15 convertible pesos, which is the equivalent of a single meal at a nice restaurant.

To quote my taxi driver:

“… development for Cuba is good, but development will also bring in maliciousness, greed, and other related things that will eventually harm a big part of our society, like what it does with most capitalistic countries.”

The ability of the next government to help spread the fruits of growth and development to all the Cubanos will be critical to the survival of one of the world’s last remaining bastion of Socialism.

 

Valle de Vinales, worth a visit!

 

A 3-week social experiment

If you have been around the Internet lately, high profile sharing-economy type companies like Uber, Lyft, Instacart etc. should sound pretty familiar to you. This post isn’t about how insane their current valuations are, or about their amazing office-designs, but the one thing that actually helps them run – people who are willing to trade their time for money in the “sharing economy”.

In the increasingly “Uber for everything” world, we have seen everything from on-demand oil changes to in-home massages. We have arrived in the “future”. Today, you can turn on your phone, click on an app, and start working for a monetary return. Empowered by technology that basically does a very fundamental thing that helps markets run – connect demand with supply, instantaneously. Out of curiosity, I ran a 3-week social experiment where I signed up to drive for Lyft (giving someone a ride), Postmates (delivering food) and Instacart (delivering groceries) to (i) figure out how much one can actually make (ii) understand the last-mile customer experience in the “sharing economy”.

Everyone loves numbers, so let’s start with numbers:

Charts charts charts

Charts charts charts

Some brief conclusions (Again, these insights are specific to Austin in the month of October, and only represents one possible interpretation of reality):

  • It is difficult to breach the $25/hr barrier that most of these companies tout as an hourly minimum
  • Services that allow for the customers to tip is generally a better option to work for as there is potential for greater upside (note: Uber does not have a tip function)
  • If you consider cost of gas, the actual hourly wage could be 10-15% lower

Random notes: (i) The $44.22 average total hourly wage is the result of a supply acquisition promo which Lyft is currently offering in certain cities across the US. Use this promo code to be eligible for between $500-$1000 bonus(depending on your city) after giving 50 rides in the first 30 days! (ii) Instacartv2 is their latest revision to their payout structure which raises the average hourly wage by about $8

Money aside, the experience of working for these “sharing economy” companies is actually quite interesting. Through the 3-weeks, I got to interact with many customers that use these services. I now understand who they are, why they use these apps and basically how technology has improved lives (… in some cases solved first-world-problems). Here is a brief description of each of them:

Lyft

lyft-ridesharing

By far my favorite of the three, Lyft users are generally super friendly and are looking to interact with you (and not their smartphones) during their ride. It is common belief that Uber users tend to see their drivers as just a cab driver, while Lyft users tend to view the entire ecosystem as more of a community. From my limited experience, I tend to agree! Over the course of the Lyft rides I gave, I managed to learn about a range of topics including how to publish a book (from a novelist), the burlesque scene in Austin (from a, well, Burlesque dancer), how to detect skin cancer (from a dermatologist), how transgenders get their names changed in the eyes of the law (from a UT Law student), things to consider before applying to an MBA program (from a first year MBA student)… Beyond learning about the most random things (did I mention that the Burlesque dancer was specifically educating me about the plus-sized Burlesque scene, which is very, very interesting to say the least), you are also likely to start to discover nook and crannies of your own city – unknown restaurants, hidden bars, new neighborhoods etc…

Most importantly though, it is the use case for ride-sharing. Ride sharing does the critical thing of unlocking supply of available transportation at an affordable rate for others. In the case of a recent Lyft ride I gave to someone with a leg injury, we figured that in the world before Uber/Lyft, his only alternative was to take exorbitant taxi rides to get from work/school-home and vice versa.

Instacart

1200_20x_20630_20Instacart_20Share_20Banner_202

While Instacart sucked at compensating well, the interesting thing was the use-case for having groceries delivered to a customer. I cannot imagine paying money for someone to do my groceries and deliver them to me; I love grocery shopping, and I guess I have time that I can dedicate to this particular activity. However, through interactions with end-users, I guess I figured out that there are clearly others who disagree, and here are the various reasons why:

  1. Too busy – This applies especially to moms who have to take care of their young children, and going to get groceries could be a complete nightmare. Moms represent a sizable portion of the userbase.
  2. Too difficult – This applies to folks with disabilities/mobility challenges. When I delivered a bag of groceries to an old lady in a wheelchair, I had the AH-HA moment that made me believe in the power of technology again
  3. Too far – This generally applies to distance, especially for folks such as college students who do not own cars. The state of public transportation in the US is pretty dismal, and here is the gap that needs to be filled. The other interesting case is where a family who lives three hours away in Houston decided to order groceries for their daughter who goes to college in Austin to make sure that she was eating right. All this empowered by technology.

Of course, there are cases of the wealthy folks who are just too lazy, and can pay anyone to do anything for them. Story – I actually delivered a bag of toilet cleaning materials to a housecleaner for her to clean this huge mansion. So basically the owner on-demanded toilet cleaning materials to his cleaner, to clean his house.

Postmates

postmates

Postmates provides the highest potential for compensation because generally users tip very well based on typical food-delivery type rates. So if they ordered $50 worth of food, they are likely to leave the Postmate with a $5-10 tip, on top of the delivery fee. However, the Postmates service is very much your typical food delivery service, helping to unlock more revenue for restaurants who do not offer delivery. The craziest thing I found out is… COLLEGE STUDENTS forking out $20 for a sandwich ($10 sandwich, $10 delivery) delivered to their door.

Conclusion

What a learning experience! Of course, I got to walk away with some extra $$$ (especially with the Lyft promo which again rewards an additional $500-$1000 bonus after you give 50 rides within the first 30 days using this promo code), which will come in useful towards our next big travel adventure in Cuba. Most importantly though, I came to appreciate a little more of the world around me, learned random factoids and trivia about the people of my city, understood the challenges of hour-wage workers (+ how important tips are) and came to appreciate the helpful side (and in some cases… obnoxious users) of the Uber-for-everything world.

Austin? Boulder? Portland?

If you want a San Francisco vibe (stereotyped: organic food, good coffee, hippie-culture, good music and chill communities) without the baggage of one of the most insane rents in the world, three American cities typically come to mind: Austin, Boulder, and Portland.

Having spent significant time visiting San Francisco and lived in Austin for the past two years, I can confidently say that Austin gives SF a good run for the money (except the year round 70 degree weather which is hard to replicate honestly). Most Austinites will agree, along with the 150 new people who move into Austin every single day.

I have always been curious though – what about the other two? Portland? Boulder? I have heard great things about them both. Portland still remains a mystery until I get to visit, but I finally got to experience Boulder first-hand this past weekend. The verdict? If you want a “perfect” life surrounded by the most gorgeous hiking trails, then yes. Otherwise, Boulder is nowhere close to Austin in terms of a good balance in all areas of the scale.

Here are a couple of reasons why Boulder < Austin, in my humble opinion…

One. Boulder has one of the most homogeneous communities I have ever seen. Ok, put in another way, everyone is white. The lack of diversity in today’s world made Boulder feel like an extremely foreign place. In contrast, both due to Austin’s proximity to the border and the ability to attract internationals, one will find a wider spectrum of diversity in Austin that is represented through food, culture, and people!

Two. Boulder is too perfect. Everything is nice, neatly laid out and generally perfect. That’s the issue – it is too perfect! It felt like a Hollywood set, artificial to a certain degree. If you live in Austin you will under this reference – Boulder represents just Terrytown, period. In contrast, there are parts of Austin which are slightly less-than-perfect, but along with that comes character and “grunginess” that allows one to feel a lot more relaxed, even if you’re wearing pajamas to your favorite grungy dive bar.

I could come up with another ton of reasons why Austin > Boulder, but I also wanted to give Boulder some credit for some pretty amazing things!

UC-Boulder: Yes, my thoughts exactly – why didn’t I go to school here!!!? 

This view, a 30min drive away.

Legal dispensaries: #4/20win

General craft beer, valet bike parking and other #hippiethings

What do you think?

Axé; good energy, life force

I first encountered Capoeira back in winter of 2007, as a freshman at college. Professor Luciano led about 20 of us on a tremendously educational trip to Salvador de Bahia in North East Brazil, where we got to immerse ourselves in Bahian culture, food, beats, and even experience Candomblé and Capoeira. Candomblé deserves an entire post on itself, as a fascinating religion practised by the “povo de santo” (people of the saint) most common among people of African descent. We had the chance to witness a full Candomblé ceremony, which was a fascinating experience. Bahia was unforgettable, and Capoeira was definitely the highlight.

Class of LAS 199 in the Bahia coast, 2007

Class of LAS 199 in the Bahia coast, 2007

As procrastination will have it, I only became serious about Capoeira a whole seven years later after I moved to Austin. I got to meet contra-maestre Esquilo serendipitously while standing in line at SXSW, and some time later I found myself part of the Capoeira Luanda community. Capoeira is beautiful; the history, the sounds, and the art of this ancient dance-fight preserved by generations of Capoeiristas. Many argue about it’s true origins, but in an oversimplified nutshell, think about it as the African slaves masking self-defense into a dance to avoid the suspicion of their Portuguese slavemasters. Along with this comes heritage, beats, song-style (call and response) from the African continent. You can take the people out of Africa, but you can never take Africa out of their soul.

Capoeira Luanda Austin! Come check us out.

Capoeira Luanda Austin! Come check us out.

In class today we learnt a new song “Estrela que brilha no céu da Bahia”, which translates to the star that shines in the sky of Bahia. To provide a little more context, many people trace Capoeira back to Salvador de Bahia, the first port of call for African slaves who arrive in Portuguese Brazil to serve their senhors (masters). Today, if you get the chance to visit Bahia, you will notice a lot more dark-skinned Afro-Brazilians than, well, white Brazilians.

IMG_2262

class scribbles

This song though, was so beautiful. In just four stanzas (two lines each) and a chorus, it captures the essence of Capoeira in a single tune. Many Capoeira songs were written by the Capoeiristas who lived during the early days, and they tell stories of Capoeira Masters, the context of slavery, the beautiful beaches (and women) of Bahia and the soul of Brazil. In Estrela que brilha no céu da Bahia, each stanza recounts certain pieces of Capoeira history, paying respect to Maestre Bimba, describing Maestre Pastinha pointing to the stars on his deathbed saying “I will always be by your side like the shining stars in the Bahia sky”, and the most beautiful of all, depicting how the night stars that used to illuminate the farms (where the slaves worked on), will continue to shine and show the path back home to Bahia for all future generations of Capoeiristas.

The history that is encapsulated in Capoeira songs will continue to cradle the dance-fight, and with each new roda played in every part of the world, the art is given a new lease of life.

and just because.

and just because.

I get fascinated by technology, again.

I must admit, sometimes I get annoyed by technology. In recent years, fascinating apps like Uber and AirBnB were created to plug huge gaps in the market, but do we really need another app to connect me to someone who would do my laundry?

I have yet to get on the Twitter bandwagon, and Lysia calls me a tech-dinosaur for refusing to use Snapchat as well. Mostly because I noticed how I unknowingly allowed Facebook to integrate itself into my life, and that I could really avoid racking up more daily “screen-time” by staying away from both Twitter and Snapchat.

… and then I came across Periscope, which was bought by Twitter for a reported $100 million earlier this year. (granted, I am a few months late but hey I spent the bulk of Spring in a country called Tajikistan where getting updated on the latest apps were probably the last thing in my daily priority list, which included figuring out how to stay warm without heating.)

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After downloading Periscope last night, I decided to explore the app “for a few minutes”, but ending spending an entire hour on it. A shady description of Periscope could read like such “twitter meets chat roulette”, or the layman description as quoted on Periscope “discovering the world through someone else’s eyes”. Here’s a detailed description of the app on Wired. The UI is fascinating, because the first thing you see is a giant world map, with live feeds buzzing from countries all over – Brazil, Russia, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia… You have the ability to “teleport” to another country, right there, through the lenses of someone else’s smartphone. #mindblown

Granted, many of the feeds were completely random nonsense – this one guy was just reading out user comments for a good 10 minutes, another was petting her cat, and you can imagine other potential abuses of Periscope (go figure). But it also has the ability for folks to broadcast live events from concerts, to World Cup matches, the Olympics, and the list goes on. Last night I watched a morning prayer session take place in Indonesia, and because the smartphone is often recorded from a very “intimate” point of view, I literally felt like I was there, except I was lying on my bed in Austin, TX. Just a couple of minutes ago I witnessed the Dalai Lama celebrate his birthday at the Global Compassion Summit, LIVE! It is one thing to see video footage retrospectively through the TV, Youtube etc., but a whole other experience to witness it live; and wow, we can do it on our smartphones. How awesome is it that we live in the 21st century!

Another beautiful use-case of Periscope is for the aspiring polyglots out there. One of the first continents I zoomed into when I opened the app was South America. I was immediately getting live feeds of people “periscoping” in Spanish, and exchanging comments with the community in Spanish. It was a great resource for learning, as you start “interacting” with native speakers, listening to the language through the voyeuristic use of the app. Brownie points for interesting live feeds, including a random guy that taught me that Rosario, where he was periscoping from, is the birth-place of the legendary Messi.

I plan to Periscope my Capoeira class tonight, and hope to see how the community responds!

Crazy? It’s all about perspectives.

Yesterday’s New York Times article called it “A most dangerous game” – Calcio Storico, a centuries-old competition in Florence with very few rules and the sort of human wreckage generally associated with gladiators. 

A.k.a. THIS:

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The ball is somewhere (else) on the pitch.

The game-play is quite simple. Two teams, one ball. Get the ball to the opponents goal line and you score. The only twist is, there are literally no rules. So from the picture above you see neither a ball nor a goal line, but just members from opposing teams having a jolly good time giving each other a good wallop. This video will give you an idea of the madness of the game.

As I was reading through the NYT article, I got reminded of Buzkashi. I attended a Buzkashi competition in Tajikistan back in March this year, and back then I thought I saw one of the most ridiculous games in my life. Here’s a pictorial recap on my Exposure post. In a nutshell: 400 horsemen, 1 dead goat carcass. The objective is to score points by dragging the carcass to the goal. No rules. This is what the carnage looks like, and yes it resembles a Mongolian battle scene from the 14th century:

Banzai meets Harakiri

Banzai meets Harakiri

To the Florentine Italians – “wow, Buzkashi is just complete madness!!!”

To the Tajik Buzkashi riders – “wow, Calcio Storico is just complete madness!!!”

To us – “these people are all mad.”

Our perspectives are largely shaped by our environment growing up, and go on to eventually define how we look and understand the world around us. From my perspective, both Buzkashi and Calcio Storico are simply priceless traces of history that continues to get preserved by the bold sportsmen over hundreds of years. Yes, it is madness, but heck, they may consider the modern man working 40 years of his life towards that corner-office a very, very insane thing as well.

Have you witnessed Calcio Storico? How was it?

100 days later, 5 lessons learnt about life, microfinance and the world

I’ve come to the end of my Kiva Fellowship, and as challenging as it was living in a country like Tajikistan, this priceless life experience has been tremendously humbling. Here are some concluding thoughts from me, as I draw the velvet curtains to this chapter.

1. People are good, and the Media can really upset your view of the world

What we consume via the Media on our TV screens often has a huge influence on our views of the world. When I was first told I would be sent to Tajikistan for my Kiva Fellowship, I too, like many friends and family, had assumed that it would be a dangerous place mostly because it was a country that bordered Afghanistan. The truth is that for many, an initial perception of Tajikistan could be shaped by an initial perception of Afghanistan (or the middle east/central asia in general) which would be sadly shaped by the behemoth called the media.

In 2013, Mehdi Hasan, political editor of the Huffington Post, delivered a well-argued rhetoric during the Oxford debates, supporting Islam as a religion of peace. I spent almost 100% of my waking hours over the past 100 days with Muslim people – Muslim colleagues, friends, neighbors. During my time in Tajikistan, I met some of the nicest, most hospitable and kind-hearted people I have ever come across in my life.  I travelled to the Afghan border, met Afghan people, and experienced genuine kindness from them. Cyclists I have met who journeyed from Europe through Asia also described Iran as the highlight of their trip from being showered with hospitality as if they were family. If I were to tell you that Iranians, Tajiks and Afghans are some of the nicest people on this planet, you have to believe me. I am a strong proponent that one must experience a place for yourself in order to draw your own conclusions – the media is one big boo-boo. Sadly, because of the media, most people of our generation will grow up thinking of a bipolar world where there is peaceful guys, and the Muslim extremists. This rift will only continue to widen.

Pendjikent

2. Wealth is not defined by $$

This is something that must have been repeated countless times, but I am writing this down not only to share with you but also to remind myself of this fact – wealth is not defined by the digits in your bank account. Tajikistan is the poorest country in Central Asia, but from what I have seen, she is also the richest country in the world – her beauty, her history, her people.

Tajiks are extremely rich in their generosity towards others. First a stranger, I would almost immediately attain the “title” of guest after a quick conversation, and proceed to be given the best things they had. Whatever little they had, they would share. If they had nothing to share, they would extend an invitation for me to return the following week so that they could somehow treat me to something. We barely know each other, but the wealth of generosity overflows from their hearts.

I remember approaching a particular rural village – simple, modest, pretty dilapidated. It was a freezing day in early Spring, the garden was still struggling to recover from the bitter winter that had just passed. When I met the Kiva client, she wore the biggest smile on her face, the joys of life beaming from her face. Her family had so little that she had to take a out a loan to purchase school supplies for her four children. She hosted me with a cup of tea, and continued to wear the smile on her face as she explained the difficulties of village life to me. “husbaht!” she would exclaim repeatedly – to be happy with life, that is the most important in all circumstances. Right at that moment, I was reminded about how wealthy she was in her mind and spirit, despite the most modest of living conditions.

Glorious beauty

Glorious beauty

3. There is a certain wonder about ordered chaos in the developing world

For those who have spent time in Third World countries, you will understand what I mean by “ordered chaos”. Let me draw a reference to traffic, something which is not only unique to Tajikistan, but in common across the world from Mumbai to Ho Chi Minh City. Traffic has to be one of the most fascinating things in this country, and how it actually functions is a daily miracle.

A red traffic light means – hey take a quick peek to check and if you do not see oncoming traffic, gas it! White line markers creating 2 lanes on the road means – who cares about lines? let’s squeeze as many vehicles as we can within the available tarmac space! A minibus stop means – if the existing bus stop space is already occupied by a minibus, pull up right beside it and create your own bus stop in the middle of the road! Direction of traffic? What direction of traffic? Drive against traffic if you need to avoid a stretch of congestion! Last but not least, the horn. God bless the inventor of the horn. The cacophony of car horns at Tajik road junctions at rush hour can send you straight to a mental institution. All that being said, the system works, and people get around!

It is quite amazing that a natural form of order develops within the chaos – people expect the pandemonium, become more tolerant (despite the occasional squabbles) with each one another, get better at driving in order to avoid accidents, and learn to make things work, somehow! This is also the magic of the ordered chaos in the developing world – people learn to hustle, adapt and make things work.

Tons of people and traffic in peaceful coexistence

Tons of people and traffic in peaceful coexistence

4. Microfinance helps, but isn’t a silver bullet to alleviate poverty

Muhammad Yunus won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for founding the Grameen Bank and pioneering the concepts of microcredit. Soon after, microfinance steadily took off and is now deeply entrenched in many parts of the developing world. Credit is something that we take for granted in the developed world, but can be life-changing for the rural poor. Credit creates opportunity, when managed properly; and this opportunity is exactly the tool needed to alleviate poverty worldwide. However, despite being such a simple concept, microfinance is not easy to operationalize in the field.

Bringing financial services to rural areas come at a significant cost, which translates into sizeable interest rates for the clients. Sadly, it is a double-edged sword, especially for those who do not know how to manage their finances. Fortunately, many of the Kiva clients I visited in Tajikistan received some form of education from their credit officers, which reduces risk of default due to client negligence. I am also glad that over-indebtedness is something that Kiva consistently tracks, but for some microfinance clients in general, the cycle of debt ends up becoming a plague in their lives. It will take innovative ideas and the persistent efforts of new social-enterprises that weave in auxiliary services in addition to credit, to increase the effectiveness of microfinance. Some of Kiva’s partners including the One Acre Fund and Proximity Designs are doing exactly that, and they help us keep alive the dream of a promising future for microcredit.

Kiva borrower Marhabo and her grandson

Kiva borrower Marhabo and her grandson

5. Life isn’t a race, take time to pause and ponder

We are wired to work, work hard and work fast. In the rhythm of our work-lives, we find ourselves consumed by our work and the ability to work anytime, anywhere. Unfortunately, many of us forget this – Our days are long, but the decades are short. Next year I turn 30, and it seemed like yesterday when I turned 20.

When I made the decision to take four months off work to volunteer as a Kiva Fellow, some people exclaimed, “wow! that is a really long time! how is that going to affect your career?” “You’ve only worked four years, and you already want to take a sabbatical?” Well, I didn’t know how the decision would affect my career. Honestly, I did think that people only took sabbaticals after working for decades. However, you will never know what tomorrow brings, and living life with no regrets is probably the best thing you could do for yourself. I first came to know about Kiva in 2008, and then about the Kiva Fellows program in 2011. For three years the thought of applying for the program lingered on in my mind, and just as there were plenty of reasons to apply, there were always 101 reasons to not do it too. Thinking back, even when I was preparing to leave, there was significant apprehension lurking…

Four months later, here is what I learnt: Taking a meaningful sabbatical is refreshing and teaches you a whole lot about yourself. Not only does it allow you to recharge, it also gives you the opportunity to contribute to causes larger than yourself for an extend period of time. The truth is, “meaningful” or not, try to take time off to do something completely different from your daily routine. Find work through wooofing, go live on a boat, heck go on a tuk-tuk race across India! If you are looking to put your professional skills to good use during your sabbatical, there are many options available! Applying to go abroad with the Kiva Fellows program is one, but I am sure you will be able to find some in your own backyard too. You will never look back years later and regret taking time to pause, breath, think and hopefully touch the lives of others along that short journey.

You will find beauty in the most unexpected places

You will find beauty in the most unexpected places